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  • 16/10/2017 | What works

    Work-related learning has long been part of the careers education landscape in secondary schools, but how effective is it for preparing young people for the world of work?

    This paper summarises the research on three forms of work related learning: work experience placements, job shadowing and workplace visits, showcasing the effectiveness of these activities and highlighting examples of best practice.

    The evidence suggests that work experience is a ‘potentially effective’ activity for young people to engage in and is associated with a range of positive outcomes. Whereas job shadowing and workplace visits have only been shown to be ‘potentially effective’, as their duration tends to be less than a work experience placement.

    Download report [PDF]

    Executive summary [PDF]

    In the report you will find:

    Introduction
    Introducing the three forms of work related learning that the paper will focus on and outlining how the findings in the report will help schools and colleges decide what activities will benefit students and how they should be implemented.

    What are work experience, job shadowing and workplace visits?
    Describing the three activities that make up work related learning and outlining how they differ in terms of intensity and structure.

    What impact do work experience, job shadowing and workplace visits have?
    Showcasing how the different forms of work related learning impact young people. Lessons for best practice? Practical advice for anyone arranging or delivering work experience to ensure all students have the opportunity to experience high-quality work experience.

    Download report [PDF]

    Executive summary [PDF]

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